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Structure of the assemblage: sizes of elements in YaNaSen, Tokyo

re-assembling the assemblage: zones of different intensities
YaNeSen’s identity of the place is mainly based on the past, traditional urban landscapes of Edo (former Tokyo), more specifically shitamachi character. However, contemporary YaNeSen preserves almost no physical evidence of that particular past, of ordinary commoner’s areas. That specific shitamachi character is based upon social structure of people, smallness of elements of built environment and specific spatial configuration essentially manifested at the public private interface. So, how is that identity based on the past managing to linger through time, despite the change of the basic elements of urban landscape? And which physical structure supports that identity? The research is based on the application of assemblage theory in analysis of relationships between elements rather than elements themselves, with the focus on their sizes and public-private interfaces as most important elements of traditional shitamachi character. The research is based on the application of assemblage theory in analysis of relationships between elements rather than elements themselves, with the focus on their sizes and public-private interfaces as most important elements of traditional shitamachi character. First stage is grounded in de-assembling the structure of YaNeSen. The focus is on sizes of elements and their spatial distribution. Main scales are built upon: streets, blocks, plots and buildings. The second stage is re-assembling the built environment from different scales (streets, blocks, plots and buildings) to zones of intensities based on the relationships between scales. The relations between distinct scales are producing zones of intensities of smallness. The built environment is incoherent, dynamic and discontinuous; within the dominantly small size of elements.